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Redcliffe Autumn Dawn

Redcliffe Autumn Dawn

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"hello, my name is Poppy and i am a 14 year old high school student at Newtown high school of the performing arts, for the past two days we have been at a sustainability camp in Canberra. Today briefly before going back to Sydney we made a stop off at parliament house for a small history lesson of the building of it, much to our surprise Tony Abbott got out of his car, walked over to us and asked for questions.

Much to his surprise we quizzed him on things such as the carbon tax, legalising Gay marriage, refugees etc.

Soon after he made one sexist remark, ignored non-brinary genders/intersex genders and someone asked him why on earth a man was the minister for woman he made a quick excuse and left.
here is the link to the youtube video of a section of our group conversation with him, i would be extremely great full if you would post it but of course i understand if somehow you cannot. my apologies if the link does not work.

Thank you very much and best of luck with the future
(my vote will be going anywhere but abbott when I’m 18)”. (x)

(Source: blksvg, via popthirdworld)

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Maculopapular Rash

whatshouldwecallmedschool:

Inigo

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climate-changing:

I know, I have reblogged this many times before.
But nothing has changed. Even if Climate Change is a big hoax, every thing on this list is desirable on its own way.

climate-changing:

I know, I have reblogged this many times before.

But nothing has changed. Even if Climate Change is a big hoax, every thing on this list is desirable on its own way.

(Source: mothernaturenetwork, via popthirdworld)

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Urthboy ft. Josh Pyke - ‘Someone Else’s House - The story goes that through his work with Life Without Barriers, Urthboy listened to the experiences of disadvantaged young folks and put it to song. ‘Someone Else’s House’ mostly focuses on the story of a kid going through the foster system, Urthboy and Pyke giving voice to the sadness, confusion and anger of being shuffled between homes, having to live in someone else’s house with “someone else’s rules.” It’s real touching, and the animated video which accompanies suggests that it all ends on a happier note. 

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"You know the kind; where you walk to work, or the kitchen, or wherever you happen to be headed, occasionally shaking your head and muttering “…damn it” to yourself."

paulverhoevenhasablognow describes his response to the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman. And beautifully describes the reaction of someone who cares.

Tags: death caring
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Water rats?

Water rats?

(via monk3y)

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tweediatrics: Here’s @mellojonny on drs as patients. On identity, shame, professionalism & the ‘wounded healer’. Just stunning http://t.co/ZxrkQIWSO0

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Today, outside a mall;

Two young fellas in Bogan-looking car roll into a disability parking space, loud music playing (Urthboy), all smiles.

Middle class Lady with 4yo, parked in the stroller bay, stops and starts yelling “Where’s your bloody card.”

~18yo Driver “On the other side of the car.”

MCL, still yelling “And who’s the one needing it??!!”

Driver “My mate. He’s got no legs.”

<Unloads fluoro green chair for said mate, who pops a wheelie and a spin; Smiles politely from under his flat brim.>

MSL, drives off aggressively.

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"We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn’t, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares. But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell’s dark vision, there was another—slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley’s vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think. What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny “failed to take into account man’s almost infinite appetite for distractions”. In 1984, Huxley added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we hate will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we love will ruin us. This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right."

Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business (via sunrec)

Both are such important books but yeah, in terms of information/entertainment especially, Huxley and Brave New World better explain how “free market competition” actually leads to really restricted and trivial mass media

(via overdreamt)

(via popthirdworld)